Burns Treatment 

Cool for a minimum of 10 minutes with cold water 
 
The information below is no replacement for attending a first aid course where you will have the opportunity to practice your skills under the guidance of one of our qualified and experienced first aid instructors. 
 
Treatment of severe burns and scalds 
Cool the injury with plenty of cold water 
Call 999/112 for an ambulance 
Keep the burn as clean as possible to minimise the risk of infection 
Continue to cool the area for at least 10 minutes or until the pain is relieved 
Carefully remove rings, watches, belts, shoes and burnt or smouldering clothing before the tissues begin to swell. 
DO NOT remove clothing that is stuck to the burn! 
When the burn is cooled, place a sterile dressing or cling film over the injury (discard the first two turns from the roll to avoid contamination) 
Reassure the casualty and treat for shock 
 
Treatment of minor burns and scalds 
Cool the injury with plenty of cold water for at least 10 minutes or until the pain is relieved 
Carefully remove rings, watches, belts, shoes and burnt or constricting clothing before the tissues begin to swell. 
DO NOT remove clothing that is stuck to the burn! 
When the burn is cooled, place a sterile dressing or cling film over the injury (discard the first two turns from the roll to avoid contamination) 
Reassure the casualty and treat for shock 
Seek medical attention 
 
What is a first degree, second degree and third degree burn? 
A first degree burn or superficial burn is where the topmost layer of skin has been burnt. A first degree burn is extremely painful as the nerve endings are sensitive. 
 
A second degree burn or partial thickness burn is where the epidermis has been burnt to varying degrees. With a partial thickness burn there is a high risk of infection and also, dependent on the severity of the burn, there may be the chance of the casualty going into shock 
 
A third degree burn or full thickness burn is where all layers of the dermis and possibly the subcutaneous layer have been damaged. This is usually a less painful injury as the nerved endings have been burnt away. However it is extremely dangerous due to the high risk of infection and also the high risk of shock.